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National Baptist Hotel

National Baptist Hotel

Built in 1923 as the Woodmen of the Union Building, this hotel, bathhouse, and performance venue quickly became the center of African American culture in Hot Springs. It housed virtually every great Negro League player and entertainer who visited the city. Famed entertainer, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson stayed here. He was a close friend of Babe Ruth and part owner of the New York Black Yankees. He was famous for leading parades through town, dancing the entire route.

bathhouserow

Bathhouse Row - Tour #13

The health benefits of “taking the baths” were a primary reason for baseball coming to Hot Springs.

happyhollow

Happy Hollow - Tour #3

Other than the hot baths, hiking the mountain trails was the biggest reason for baseball players to train in Hot Springs.

hs_country_club

Hot Springs Country Club - Tour #24

Although the original clubhouse was replaced long ago, the golf course is essentially the same as when it was founded in 1898.

Oaklawn Park

Oaklawn Park - Tour #23

Many of baseball’s greatest players were fond of thoroughbred racing.

Ohio Club1926

Ohio and Southern Clubs - Tour #12

Most Major League players of the early 20th century had few inhibitions, and many enjoyed gambling during training trips to Hot Springs.

fogelfield

Fogel Field - Tour #10

This field, also known as Fordyce Field, was constructed in 1912 by the Hot Springs Park Company to meet the demand of over 250 major leaguers training in Hot Springs.

babe-ruth-hot-springs-1915

Majestic Field - Tour #19

Built in 1909 as the Boston Red Sox training center, this field was also used by the Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Dodgers.

samguinnfield

Sam Guinn Field - Tour #25

This site some of the greatest Negro League teams, including the Pittsburgh Crawfords, Homestead Grays, Memphis Red Sox, and Kansas City Monarchs.

Whittington Park

Whittington Park - Tour #8

More baseball was played in the ballpark on this corner than anywhere else in Hot Springs.

National Baptist Hotel

National Baptist Hotel - Tour #26

Built in 1923 as the Woodmen of the Union Building, this hotel, bathhouse, and performance venue quickly became the center of African American culture in Hot Springs.

Decorated Arlington

The Arlington Hotel - Tour #4

The old Arlington Hotel, originally located across the street on the Arlington Lawn, was the site of the infamous arrest of New York Giant’s manager John “Mugsy” McGraw.

Eastman Hotel

The Eastman Hotel - Tour #1

Built in 1890, the elegant, 500-room Eastman Hotel was a hub for the baseball community in the early 20th century.

majestichotel

The Majestic Hotel - Tour #5

Constructed in 1902 and expanded in 1926, the Majestic was a favorite destination for several Major League teams including the renowned Boston Red Sox.

AlSimmons

Al Simmons - Tour #28

“Bucketfoot Al” credited the hot water baths and mountain trails of the city with saving his baseball career.

New York's  Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth - Tour #11

Ruth trained here nine times and became a very familiar face around Hot Springs.

Buck Ewing

Buck Ewing - Tour #2

Many baseball historians regard Ewing as the greatest all-around 19th century player.

cy_young

Cy Young - Tour #15

For decades, the Missouri-Pacific Railroad Depot was the bustling transportation hub of Hot Springs.

hank_aaron

Hank Aaron - Tour #22

At this field on October 1, 1952, 18-year old Hank Aaron and the Indianapolis Clowns played in one of 12 games of the Negro League World Series against the Birmingham Black Barons.

honus

Honus Wagner - Tour #17

No player left a bigger legacy in Hot Springs than “the Flying Dutchman.”

jackie_robinson

Jackie Robinson - Tour #21

One of the most important events in Hot Springs history occurred where you are standing.

mel_ott

Mel Ott - Tour #7

This Hall of Fame outfielder, personally tutored by John “Mugsy” McGraw, played his entire career with the New York Giants, hitting 511 home runs.

roger_hornsby

Rogers Hornsby - Tour #20

At the conclusion of his historic Hall of Fame career, Rogers “The Rajah” Hornsby returned to Hot Springs to oversee the nationally-recognized baseball school.

Sam Crawford

Sam “Wahoo” Crawford - Tour #6

On March 5, 1911, here at Whittington Park, the man who remains the leader in triples (312) in Major League history played in an exhibition game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and a group of American League All-Stars.

smokey_joe_wood

Smoky Joe Wood - Tour #9

After training in Hot Springs in 1912, twenty-two-year-old Smoky Joe Wood compiled a 34 – 5 record and led the Boston Red Sox to victory in the World Series.

StanM

Stan Musial - Tour #27

The legendary slugger often visited Hot Springs to prepare for one of his twenty-two seasons in the majors.

tris_speaker

Tris Speaker - Tour #14

Often regarded as Major League Baseball’s greatest defensive outfielder, “The Grey Eagle” trained for many years in Hot Springs as a player and as a manager.

walter_johnson

Walter Johnson - Tour #16

Walter Johnson trained in Hot Springs over many seasons.

AlSimmons

Al Simmons - Tour #28

“Bucketfoot Al” credited the hot water baths and mountain trails of the city with saving his baseball career.

New York's  Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth - Tour #11

Ruth trained here nine times and became a very familiar face around Hot Springs.

bathhouserow

Bathhouse Row - Tour #13

The health benefits of “taking the baths” were a primary reason for baseball coming to Hot Springs.

Buck Ewing

Buck Ewing - Tour #2

Many baseball historians regard Ewing as the greatest all-around 19th century player.

cy_young

Cy Young - Tour #15

For decades, the Missouri-Pacific Railroad Depot was the bustling transportation hub of Hot Springs.

fogelfield

Fogel Field - Tour #10

This field, also known as Fordyce Field, was constructed in 1912 by the Hot Springs Park Company to meet the demand of over 250 major leaguers training in Hot Springs.

hank_aaron

Hank Aaron - Tour #22

At this field on October 1, 1952, 18-year old Hank Aaron and the Indianapolis Clowns played in one of 12 games of the Negro League World Series against the Birmingham Black Barons.

happyhollow

Happy Hollow - Tour #3

Other than the hot baths, hiking the mountain trails was the biggest reason for baseball players to train in Hot Springs.

honus

Honus Wagner - Tour #17

No player left a bigger legacy in Hot Springs than “the Flying Dutchman.”

hs_country_club

Hot Springs Country Club - Tour #24

Although the original clubhouse was replaced long ago, the golf course is essentially the same as when it was founded in 1898.

jackie_robinson

Jackie Robinson - Tour #21

One of the most important events in Hot Springs history occurred where you are standing.

babe-ruth-hot-springs-1915

Majestic Field - Tour #19

Built in 1909 as the Boston Red Sox training center, this field was also used by the Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Dodgers.

mel_ott

Mel Ott - Tour #7

This Hall of Fame outfielder, personally tutored by John “Mugsy” McGraw, played his entire career with the New York Giants, hitting 511 home runs.

National Baptist Hotel

National Baptist Hotel - Tour #26

Built in 1923 as the Woodmen of the Union Building, this hotel, bathhouse, and performance venue quickly became the center of African American culture in Hot Springs.

Oaklawn Park

Oaklawn Park - Tour #23

Many of baseball’s greatest players were fond of thoroughbred racing.

Ohio Club1926

Ohio and Southern Clubs - Tour #12

Most Major League players of the early 20th century had few inhibitions, and many enjoyed gambling during training trips to Hot Springs.

roger_hornsby

Rogers Hornsby - Tour #20

At the conclusion of his historic Hall of Fame career, Rogers “The Rajah” Hornsby returned to Hot Springs to oversee the nationally-recognized baseball school.

samguinnfield

Sam Guinn Field - Tour #25

This site some of the greatest Negro League teams, including the Pittsburgh Crawfords, Homestead Grays, Memphis Red Sox, and Kansas City Monarchs.

Sam Crawford

Sam “Wahoo” Crawford - Tour #6

On March 5, 1911, here at Whittington Park, the man who remains the leader in triples (312) in Major League history played in an exhibition game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and a group of American League All-Stars.

smokey_joe_wood

Smoky Joe Wood - Tour #9

After training in Hot Springs in 1912, twenty-two-year-old Smoky Joe Wood compiled a 34 – 5 record and led the Boston Red Sox to victory in the World Series.

StanM

Stan Musial - Tour #27

The legendary slugger often visited Hot Springs to prepare for one of his twenty-two seasons in the majors.

Decorated Arlington

The Arlington Hotel - Tour #4

The old Arlington Hotel, originally located across the street on the Arlington Lawn, was the site of the infamous arrest of New York Giant’s manager John “Mugsy” McGraw.

Eastman Hotel

The Eastman Hotel - Tour #1

Built in 1890, the elegant, 500-room Eastman Hotel was a hub for the baseball community in the early 20th century.

majestichotel

The Majestic Hotel - Tour #5

Constructed in 1902 and expanded in 1926, the Majestic was a favorite destination for several Major League teams including the renowned Boston Red Sox.

tris_speaker

Tris Speaker - Tour #14

Often regarded as Major League Baseball’s greatest defensive outfielder, “The Grey Eagle” trained for many years in Hot Springs as a player and as a manager.

walter_johnson

Walter Johnson - Tour #16

Walter Johnson trained in Hot Springs over many seasons.

Whittington Park

Whittington Park - Tour #8

More baseball was played in the ballpark on this corner than anywhere else in Hot Springs.